1. What is coaching?
  2. How does coaching work?
  3. Is coaching for me?
  4. Am I ready to commit to coaching?
  5. Why have a coach?
  6. What are the benefits of coaching?
  7. How can students specifically benefit?
  8. 8. What changes can I expect? How long does coaching take? How often should I see the coach?
  9. How is coaching different from therapy?
  10. What about confidentiality?
  11. What assessments do you offer?
  12. Will there be homework?
  13. What is MBTI?
  14. How can MBTI benefit teams?

 

1. What is coaching?

Coaching is fundamentally about facilitating desired change.

Coaching is oriented toward action and the future. Coaches work with people who are designing their futures, learning new skills, seeking personal and professional fulfillment and more balance in their lives.

Coaching assists the client in identifying, prioritizing and implementing choices.

Everyone can benefit from working with a coach during times of transition, and personal and professional growth.

There are two main areas in coaching:

  • Life coaching helps you deal with personal growth issues and make transformations in your life; for example, having better relationships with others, or asking what life is calling you to do. Life coaching looks at ways to create the life you want to live. Life coaching can also help you manage life transitions.
  • Executive coaching focuses on individuals, entrepreneurs and executives who seek coaching either independently or through their organizations. It focuses on enhancing management and leadership skills and increasing emotional intelligence; as well as improving performance including communication and presentation.

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2. How does coaching work?

Coaching is conducted either in person or via the telephone. Coaching sessions range from thirty minutes to one hour per week. At the beginning of coaching a mutually acceptable agreement will be established, stating fees and frequency of meetings. The contract guarantees complete confidentiality.

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3. Is coaching for me?

People who come for coaching are looking for more direction, balance, joy, authenticity or fulfillment in their lives. They want better results than they have been able to achieve on their own.

Coaching helps you become clear about what you want in your life and face the challenges of making change happen. If you know you’re not performing at your best or that your company is not as competitive as it needs to be in today’s evolving marketplace, coaching makes change possible and gets results faster than you may be able to achieve otherwise.

Coaching is about taking on change with real outcomes. It’s about changing your present in order to create a better future.

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4. Am I ready to commit to coaching?

Circle the number that comes closest to representing how true the statement is for you right now. Then, score yourself using the key at the bottom of the page. Your coach needs for you to be at the place in life where you are coachable. This test will help you discover how coachable you are right now.

Coachability Index

<- Less True – More True Statement ->

1  2  3  4  5 I am fully willing to do the work involved in coaching.
1  2  3  4  5 I’ll give the coach the benefit of the doubt and “try on” new concepts or different ways of doing things.
1  2  3  4  5 I will be honest with the coach.
1  2  3  4  5 If I feel that I am not getting what I need or expect from the coach, I will share this as soon as I sense it and ask that I get what I want and need from the relationship.
1  2  3  4  5 I am willing to eliminate or modify the self-defeating behaviours which limit my success.
1  2  3  4  5 I see coaching as a worthwhile investment in my life. I am aware of the financial commitment and can be relied upon to honour all arrangements.

TOTAL SCORE (add up all numbers)

Scoring Key

0 – 10  Not coachable
11 – 15  Coachable, but make sure ground rules are honoured
16 – 25  Coachable
26 – 35  Very coachable; ask the coach to ask a lot from you!
Modified from Coach U Inc., 1999

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5. Why have a coach?

Think of your coach as your own personal advocate, champion, mentor and partner as you work toward establishing a new truth about yourself. Whether it’s improving your personal skills, developing a high-performance team, creating a strategic vision for your company, telling the truth about who you are, or kicking a bad habit, the focus is always on you.

A coach helps you clarify your goals and keeps you on track to achieve them. Eventually, you should be able to maintain the results on your own, but until you’re comfortable making the changes or have the ability to get refocused, a coach is there to support you. The coach will work with you at your own pace.

Coaching accelerates personal and professional growth, as efficiently and effectively as possible.

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6. What are the benefits to coaching?

  • Discover and implement your own definition of balance
  • Advance and control your professional destiny
  • Learn and use your key strengths as a resource for high-level performance
  • Manage stress as you navigate life’s transitions
  • Understand and manage change
  • Strengthen your sense of self, increase your self-esteem and self-confidence
  • Clarify your values to guide you in decision making
  • Develop a plan of action to meet your goals
  • Improve your communication, listening and presentation skills
  • Discover best-fit career choices for you, your partner and your children

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7. How can students specifically benefit?

There are many pressures and expectations that you face as you make professional, academic and life choices. The challenge is to find your own voice, your own path and your own definition of balance. Coaching can assist in this period of turbulence and transition by helping you:

  • Manage stress as you navigate school, work and social life
  • Recognize and use your key strengths as a resource for high-level performance
  • Strengthen your sense of self, increase your self-esteem and self-confidence
  • Access support for thesis and assignment completion
  • Improve your communication, listening and presentation skills
  • Develop a plan of action to meet your goals
  • Gain control of your professional destiny
  • Clarify your values to guide you in decision making
  • Discover your best-fit career choices
  • Understand and manage change

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8. What changes can I expect? How long does coaching take? How often should I see the coach?

Coaching is conducted either in person or via the telephone. Coaching sessions range from thirty minutes to one hour per week. At the beginning of coaching a mutually acceptable agreement will be established, stating fees and frequency of meetings. The contract guarantees complete confidentiality.

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9. How is coaching different from therapy?

COACHING

THERAPY

Coaching works with people who are:

Therapy works with people:

  • Seeking focus, strategy and motivation
  • Eager to move to a higher level of functioning
  • Asking “how to”
  • Designing their future, learning new skills and seeking more balance in their lives
  • Psychologically dysfunctional in a some way
  • Seeking self-understanding
  • Asking “why”
  • Dealing with old issues, emotional pain or traumas, seeking resolution and healing

Approach with Coaching:

Approach with Therapy:

  • Begins with premise the client is whole
  • Refers individuals with prolonged depression, severe anxiety, phobias, harmful addictions and destructive or abusive behaviour patterns to mental health professionals
  • Primary focus on actions and the future
  • Oriented toward solving problems through action
  • Works mainly with the conscious mind
  • Assists the clients in identifying, prioritizing and implementing choices
  • Helps client learn new skills and tools for personal growth and mastery
  • Helps client get clear on his or her own values and align actions to them
  • Encourages and requests proactive behaviour
  • Begins with the premise that client needs healing
  • Treats individuals with prolonged depression, severe anxiety, phobias, harmful and destructive or abusive behaviour patterns
  • Primary focus on feelings and history
  • Works to bring unconscious into conscious
  • Assists the client in untangling unconscious conflicts which interfere with choices
  • Helps client resolve old pain and terminate old coping mechanisms.

Process of Coaching:

Process of Therapy:

  • Focused on recognizing and developing potential
  • Main tools include accountability, inquiry, goal-setting and strategy
  • Deals mainly with external issues, looks for external solutions to internal blocks
  • Focused on healing and restoring functioning
  • Main tools include listening, reflecting, confrontation and interpretation
  • Deals mainly with internal issues; looks for internal resolution
Source: Hayden and Whitworth’s Distinction between Coaching and Therapy

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10. What about confidentiality?

We hold our clients’ issues in the strictest of confidence.

In fact, we will turn away if an organization asks us to disclose anything about our clients that they would not disclose about themselves.

We will gladly sign any non-disclosure forms you offer us to ensure we protect your privacy.

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11. What assessments do you offer?

  • Myers Briggs Type Indicator
  • Signature Strength Inventory
  • PLM Advanced Analysis
  • Career Interest Profiler
  • Work Personality Index
  • Career Transition Report
  • Personal Effectiveness Report
  • Clifton Strengths Finder

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12. Will there be homework?

Often, at the end of the coaching session, powerful questions are given by the coach to deepen the learning and provoke further reflection. The intention is for you to consider the inquiry between sessions and see what occurs for you. The inquiry is usually based upon a particular situation that the client is currently addressing.

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13. What is MBTI?

MBTI stands for Myers Briggs Type Indicator, a self-report questionnaire designed to make Jung’s theory of psychological types understandable and useful in everyday life. MBTI results identify valuable differences between normal, healthy people, differences that can be the source of much misunderstanding and miscommunication.

After more than 50 years of research and development, the current MBTI is the most widely used instrument for understanding normal personality differences. Because it explains basic patterns in human functioning, the MBTI is used for a wide variety of purposes, including the following:

  • Self-understanding and development
  • Career development and exploration
  • Organization development
  • Team building
  • Management and leadership training
  • Problem solving
  • Relationship counseling
  • Education and curriculum development
  • Academic counseling
  • Diversity and multicultural training

Taking the MBTI inventory and receiving feedback will identify for the individuals their unique characteristics. The information enhances understanding of themselves, their motivations, their natural strengths, and their potential areas for growth. It will also help individuals appreciate people who differ from them. The MBTI inventory identifies polar opposites in four areas:

    1. Extraversion or Introversion:
      The way people naturally prefer to direct and get energy
    2. Sensing or Intuition:
      The way people naturally prefer to take in information
    3. Thinking or Feeling:
      The way people naturally prefer to make decisions
    4. Judging or Perceiving:
      The way people naturally prefer to organize their external world

(Source: Type and MBTI)

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14. How can MBTI benefit teams?

The MBTI specifically aids team members by:

    • Reducing unproductive work
    • Identifying areas of strength and possible areas of weakness for the team
    • Clarifying team behaviour
    • Helping to match specific task assignments with team members according to their MBTI preferences
    • Supplying a framework in which team members can understand and better handle conflict
    • Helping individuals understand how different perspectives and methods can lead to useful and effective problem solving
    • Maximizing a team’s diversity in order to reach useful and insightful conclusions.

(Source: Type and Teams)

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